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Author Topic: Fret leveling with a one-way truss rod  (Read 2028 times)

Tyler

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Fret leveling with a one-way truss rod
« on: August 08, 2013, 07:48:58 PM »

So, I have a guitar which appears to be fitted with a one-way truss rod.

With the strings removed, and the truss rod loosened as much as I can get it, the neck still has a slight back bow.

Is there a magical way to make the neck sit flat, so that I can level the frets?
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Mat

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Re: Fret leveling with a one-way truss rod
« Reply #1 on: August 09, 2013, 02:21:43 PM »

A magickal way would be to get help from demons.
Im no expert but ... did you fully loosen the strings and then loosen the truss rod? The rod may have pulled the neck back when you removed the tension of the strings? I guess the best way is to loosen both together and gradually.
To reshape your neck you could put the 2 or 3 middle strings back on and slightly tighten them to pull the neck into a slight forward bow (while keeping the truss loose).
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Tyler

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Re: Fret leveling with a one-way truss rod
« Reply #2 on: September 20, 2013, 08:28:23 PM »

Yeah. The strings pull the neck forward, and the one-way truss rod can pull it back to balance, but since it only goes one-way, it can't pull the neck forward to make it flat without the strings.

It looks like a neck jig is my best option.
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Mat

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Re: Fret leveling with a one-way truss rod
« Reply #3 on: September 21, 2013, 03:50:43 PM »

I also realised since the truss rod sits in a curved cavity and naturally wants to be straight it will try tomake that curved cavity straight, therefore backbowing the neck. Pros use neck jigs. There must be a cheaper way. I have seen people recommend levelling frets with the strings on and tuned to pitch, as this changes the shape of the neck ... locate the high spot by playing, detune and move a minimal number of strings out of the way to file, sounds very time-consuming.
On my first bass conversion i clamped a radius block down on the 24EDO frets to help level them. It worked so well i may not even need to level the frets by filing, which i was dreading.
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