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Print Page - ways to promote MG?

Xenharmonic Guitarist

General => Other Topics => Topic started by: Ron on March 28, 2011, 01:39:20 PM

Title: ways to promote MG?
Post by: Ron on March 28, 2011, 01:39:20 PM
what are some good, non-spammy ways to promote MG?

any sites you guys can think of or other forums that would attract the experimental variety or highly advanced variety of players?

I say highly advanced because I think when you get to a point and have been teaching guitar for awhile you tend to want something really new sounding

I know there are tons of guitarists in the real world willing to completely drop 12 and go to something new. This seems dramatic, but everyone I meet at the guitar stores I walk into want one or are interested enough to play it, and ask tons of questions. I think for this reason something like 19, 22, 24, 26, or 31 would be good for starter guitars as the fifths aren't completely destroyed, and let's face it, it's all most weekend-warrior guitar types know. There's also that number of guitarists who hate fifths and want to avoid using them because they sound generic and theyre sick of cycles of fifths...

anyways.... everyone likes micro besides maybe a handful of internet critics who don't really matter. People are ready and they need to know! _R
Title: Re: ways to promote MG?
Post by: Mat on March 29, 2011, 02:43:09 PM
Hi Ron. I've already posted about this forum at sevenstring.org (lots of interest), unfretted.com (fretless guitar forum), Yahoo MMM, nonoctave.com. I'll probably also post at talkbass.com (there are a few micro bassists there), and the Yahoo Tuning List and Just Intonation groups.

The electro-music.com experimental music forum has a micro subforum here: http://www.electro-music.com/forum/forum-147.html (http://www.electro-music.com/forum/forum-147.html) but I'm not a member.
Title: Re: ways to promote MG?
Post by: EricJacksonArts on April 03, 2011, 05:13:14 PM

 Microtones are readily available on guitars that people already have. And when the standard 12 frets per octave doesn't cut it, I'll use the ultimate microtonal guitar; the fretless.
Title: Re: ways to promote MG?
Post by: Ron on April 03, 2011, 09:37:37 PM
I think I somehow messed up your post trying to quote it and failing miserably. im going to try to get it fixed back - here's my reply about fretless.

I agree that people should use slides to  hear the more in tune intervals, but I dont think fretless is by any means the ultimate. Its a misconception I think alot of people have about microtonality and specifically xentonality. If you wanted for example to make a progression that moves up and down a Fokker lattice, using vertical harmony in the 13-limit, there is no way of getting it perfect JI, while a fretted instrument it would be closer if not near perfect, plus all the sustain is there. This was in an essay I wrote for this site when it first started, which was serving to educate common microtonal misconceptions about harmony I read posted by the general user at sevenstring.org (the anti-academic, anti-intellectual guitar forum).

While I think fretless would be good for playing warping MOS music, and moving across generators, I don't think anyone has or will utilize this as such besides Stephen Taylor.

the idea is, if you want to build in tune vertical harmony triads and move down a lattice changing one note at a time in say 7 or 11 limit maybe 22 would interest you..  Paul Erlich was the first to show me how to use lattices, although I had seen them online and knew they were extremely useful and used by the best theorists to describe whats happening in a temperament. It wasn't until the Bohlen Pierce tuning symposium last year I actually got around to using one and seeing the true benefits of lattices in depth.

Heres a clip from Paul's lecture where we played "diatonic" triads on guitar and keyboard (fretted and tuned to Bohlen Pierce) moving down a lattice in the Bohlen-Pierce scale which is a non-octave scale without even partials based on 3:5:7:9 JI).  This is a clip of his 45 min lecture and the example starts 1/2 way in.

http://ronsword.com/latticeprogressioninBP.mp3 (http://ronsword.com/latticeprogressioninBP.mp3)

anyways fretless can mimic any scale melodically and if the fourths are tuned or altered from standard tuning that is a way to get closer to achieving intonation in say Magic temperament (a scale ive never heard a fretless player play in). Unfortunately most people are limited technically on fretless because they never learn scale inversions obviously because of how insane it is etc.. I had an idea awhile back to make a fretless book based on every MOS from standard Eadgbe tuning when I heard there was a teacher at Berklee who taught fretless but didn't play in higher prime harmonies.
Anyways I visited your site and did like the fretless stuff you have up.
Title: Re: ways to promote MG?
Post by: EricJacksonArts on April 04, 2011, 04:13:39 AM
Thanks for checking some of my stuff out, glad you enjoyed it.

As far as intonation and sustain and all things fretless. I consider the fretless guitar to be the best choice, microtonally and 12tet, due to its ability to go in and out of any system: equal or not. I've often thought of getting a 19TET neck, or even a 12 Tone Ultra Plus from freenote, but have decided against doing such because of the limitations. I want JI notes on more than just every other fret, and while 19 is a wonderful system, I'm locked into it. Yes the same could be said about my 12TET guitars, but as a teacher--and a musician (though I don't often play with other musicians) I prefer the ability to share a language that most musicians speak. The fretless allows me to do this while going in and out of systems. On a fretless, I can play with a piano player, and then play the Archetyes Enharmonic scale if I'd like. Since my microtonality is mostly based in JI, the fretless guitar's ability to transpose different keys is a crucial factor--and again the fact that I can choose my intervals and notes on the fly. Sustain and intonation are down to two factors; the setup and materials, and the player. In nearly 5 years of playing the fretless guitar, there are No problems with sustain, and there are no problems with intonation. When I first picked up the fretless it sounded worse than a dying cat, but after considerable practice, and knowledge about setups, there are no issues. I can achieve perfect sustain with vibrato techniques, and nail-stop techniques. Intonation again is up to the player. The guitar (with frets) sets us up for a bad position in which we don't actually listen to our notes (thus the obsession with Tablature) unlike a violinist or cellist who is always listening to the notes. This is key to playing the fretless in tune and well. I have played with many different musicians, in different styles, and not once was I ostracized for playing fretless. I had more issues over the fact that I had a seven string guitar and preferred to play my notes at a quick tempo, than anything else. Since the initial learning curve of the fretless, there are no problems.


I will also comment on something I've seen occur here on this forum, and something which I think is detrimental on a whole number of levels. This thread is the second time I've seen words hurled at SevenString[dot]Org-- and I sincerely hope this forum won't turn into a sonic dick measuring contest.

I have often thought of those who look down on Microtones as ignorant, but I feel that many microtonalists harbor a great deal of arrogance; something I too am admittedly guilty of at times. If we want to promote microtonality for the guitar or otherwise, we're not going to get anywhere by calling people 'anti-academic' or 'anti-intellectual'. While I agree that a lot of guys on SS.Org are a bit ignorant in some aspects (more in their political forum than anything else) how can you blame them? They go to school and learn of 12 tones, they turn on the TV and hear commercials with music based on 12TET, etc. This is like only hearing English your whole life, then hearing Latin and saying "It's not English"

Music, regardless of how many notes you have in an octave, should not be a tool used to put others down--especially when you're using a system that is unfamiliar and can sound strange at first. 

This has been, in my opinion, the single greatest thing holding microtonality back; this 'holier than thou' attitude which serves no one any good--only creates more separation. 
Title: Re: ways to promote MG?
Post by: Ron on April 04, 2011, 05:55:27 AM
Thanks for checking some of my stuff out, glad you enjoyed it.

As far as intonation and sustain and all things fretless. I consider the fretless guitar to be the best choice, microtonally and 12tet, due to its ability to go in and out of any system: equal or not. I've often thought of getting a 19TET neck, or even a 12 Tone Ultra Plus from freenote, but have decided against doing such because of the limitations. I want JI notes on more than just every other fret, and while 19 is a wonderful system, I'm locked into it. Yes the same could be said about my 12TET guitars, but as a teacher--and a musician (though I don't often play with other musicians) I prefer the ability to share a language that most musicians speak. The fretless allows me to do this while going in and out of systems. On a fretless, I can play with a piano player, and then play the Archetyes Enharmonic scale if I'd like. Since my microtonality is mostly based in JI, the fretless guitar's ability to transpose different keys is a crucial factor--and again the fact that I can choose my intervals and notes on the fly. Sustain and intonation are down to two factors; the setup and materials, and the player. In nearly 5 years of playing the fretless guitar, there are No problems with sustain, and there are no problems with intonation. When I first picked up the fretless it sounded worse than a dying cat, but after considerable practice, and knowledge about setups, there are no issues. I can achieve perfect sustain with vibrato techniques, and nail-stop techniques. Intonation again is up to the player. The guitar (with frets) sets us up for a bad position in which we don't actually listen to our notes (thus the obsession with Tablature) unlike a violinist or cellist who is always listening to the notes. This is key to playing the fretless in tune and well. I have played with many different musicians, in different styles, and not once was I ostracized for playing fretless. I had more issues over the fact that I had a seven string guitar and preferred to play my notes at a quick tempo, than anything else. Since the initial learning curve of the fretless, there are no problems.


I will also comment on something I've seen occur here on this forum, and something which I think is detrimental on a whole number of levels. This thread is the second time I've seen words hurled at SevenString[dot]Org-- and I sincerely hope this forum won't turn into a sonic dick measuring contest.

I have often thought of those who look down on Microtones as ignorant, but I feel that many microtonalists harbor a great deal of arrogance; something I too am admittedly guilty of at times. If we want to promote microtonality for the guitar or otherwise, we're not going to get anywhere by calling people 'anti-academic' or 'anti-intellectual'. While I agree that a lot of guys on SS.Org are a bit ignorant in some aspects (more in their political forum than anything else) how can you blame them? They go to school and learn of 12 tones, they turn on the TV and hear commercials with music based on 12TET, etc. This is like only hearing English your whole life, then hearing Latin and saying "It's not English"

Music, regardless of how many notes you have in an octave, should not be a tool used to put others down--especially when you're using a system that is unfamiliar and can sound strange at first. 

This has been, in my opinion, the single greatest thing holding microtonality back; this 'holier than thou' attitude which serves no one any good--only creates more separation.

Well honestly this site began in response to those posts at sevenstring. There is no holier than thou attitude, only mathematical and intonation fact. When I responded there, I was banned, and my posts removed. So I see it as nothing BUT anti-intellectual, and all I was posting there was math ratios and talking about commas in relation to temperaments. so its not a sonic dick measuring contest but an all out war! I challenge anyone over there to a 12-tet duel!

This site really serves as a forum to set these people straight, over all other things, because it seems to be a popular influence on younger metal guitarists especially. 
I can say that most people who can keep up with the tuning-math forums and whats happening in the xenharmonic world have a better grasp on the 12 system than those who exclusively use 12 that I know. ...and its not up to 12toners to be impressed, they're behind!

Youre missing what I'm really saying about fretless..fretless is great as a tool to have but I haven't met a fretless player who's intonation is "perfect". If you say you're playing just intonation but it's certainly not 5-limit JI in the recordings I heard, if not what is it then - 7-limit? Just Intonation is within 5 cents of a ratio. Can you see my point yet? I have never heard mavila progressions from a fretless player.  The other main point is that the single line lead tone suffers..but mainly about intonation not being 100%. I have never heard a fretless player play perfectly in tune 7 limit progressions, or 11 limit progression, because it's very difficult to keep everything within 5 cents of JI. Shawn lane and Guthrie Govan especially do good with 5-limit and chromatic on fretless. No (intentional) higher harmonics yet.

IMO the thing holding microtonality back is nothing but money, promotion, and hardware/software. Even that isn't really holding it back. There are programs all over the country teaching it in the US, Tampa, Boston, L.A., NYC, Montclair, Santa Barbara, Urbana, etc, etc. ... there is more interesting music pouring out of the tuning lists and forums than I've ever seen anywhere else on the web... It's not that it's unknown.. it's that 12-tone equal temperament is being taught as "Music Theory", while the actual theory part involving temperament, commas, just intonation, etc is completely ignored. Also the production side of things is still lacking, but look at Auto-tune. Everyone uses it for rap but rarely do I hear people praising the fact it has all those scales built in. If there were simple piano rolls and halberstadt replacement keyboards (and a micro Lady gaga) it would be in full swing. It's all still very new (extreme conceptions xenharmony) and only since the mid 70's has music theory continued moving along. People who helped this greatly are Ervin Wilson, George Secor, Paul Erlich and Gene Ward Smith to name a few.








Title: Re: ways to promote MG?
Post by: EricJacksonArts on April 04, 2011, 09:27:55 AM
Well honestly this site began in response to those posts at sevenstring. There is no holier than thou attitude, only mathematical and intonation fact. When I responded there, I was banned, and my posts removed. So I see it as nothing BUT anti-intellectual, and all I was posting there was math ratios and talking about commas in relation to temperaments. so its not a sonic dick measuring contest but an all out war! I challenge anyone over there to a 12-tet duel!

This site really serves as a forum to set these people straight, over all other things, because it seems to be a popular influence on younger metal guitarists especially. 
I can say that most people who can keep up with the tuning-math forums and whats happening in the xenharmonic world have a better grasp on the 12 system than those who exclusively use 12 that I know. ...and its not up to 12toners to be impressed, they're behind!


Fact? What fact? Your music may be mathematically solid, but there's nothing factual about it. There's nothing 'Factual' about music at all. Music isn't about facts, you can't pin something musically down and say 'this sounds good' because the entire musical experience is based solely on perception. I've met people who claim they hate Steve Vai cause there's no 'soul' in his playing, yet I find his playing to be some of the most expressive I've ever heard. Again, two people can hear the same song (regardless of the notes being used) and hear two different results. There are no inherent truths in this world. You cannot break down the frequencies in a Just Major chord and find evidence of 'Good' or 'Sounds Pleasant'. Some people prefer the 12TET Major Chord...which I am stunned by, but then again, I don't have their ears or their brain, so my perception of that is different--which has now resulted in most piano music sounding like shit to my ears!

I've been frequenting (little posting, more reading) SS.org for quite awhile, and they will typically ban you if you are particularly malicious in speech or trying to pull scams through the for sell sections. (And of course--as with all forums--if you post anything related to Piracy). In order for them to ban you, you must've done or said something serious. Microtonal guitars have frequently popped up on there, and while there is a great deal of people who make ignorant statements, there are plenty of people who do have knowledge and may admit it sounds strange to their ears, but its simply because they aren't used to it. I have yet, if ever, to see a moderator shut down a thread because they didn't like the music in there. Only when things got out of hand in terms of elitism and purely hateful and arrogant speech. They have some strange ideas over there (mostly in line with their criticisms of EMG pickups, scale length (which for them has to be at least 20 feet long to sound good) and string thickness) but the way you describe that forum is...slanted.

And an "all out war"? Come on, really? Music should bring people together, not divide people--I don't care how many notes you're using per octave.


"Set people straight"
"they're behind"

Those are some serious words right there, and if I didn't like microtones for my own reasons, you can damn well bet I'd be dissuaded by that shear arrogance. People can like whatever the hell music they want (and there are tons of social, cultural, and economic factors that play roles in this) and they sure as hell don't need someone to demonstrate their 'facts' to prove them wrong. Odds are they won't see it the way you do and take it as a personal affront.

I tried to find posts you've made on SS.org and found Nothing Most of the posts regarding your instruments/music has been from Matt Cooper. I also looked up other members who have been banned and can find a paper trail as to what put them there. (Its plenty ripe in the politics section) but I can't find anything from you...so either SS.org is completely against you and the world of microtones and has hidden everything about them to 'hide the truth' (which there currently is a post about the microtonal multi-output 8 string that strangely hasn't been shut down) or you're exaggerating what goes on over there.

I'm not sure what tracks of mine you heard, but I can assure you that none of those tracks use JI or any microtones (and if they do, it was by accident) So you won't hear anything I've done using microtones for now. The stuff I'm working on is incredibly different.



And as far as accuracy on a fretless instrument...

Edward Powell Solo-piece (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dmwDidrLLQw#)


Willie McBlind - Blood Moon / Nobody's Fault But Mine (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H8P2Cy6xXlc#)


If your priority is to have SUPER accurate notes, than you should be playing synth and computer based instruments. Guitars cannot be accurate to such an Nth degree. There are so many factors than even Harry Partch said, in Genesis of a Music, that relying on the ear for the adapted Viola had better results than finding the playing areas than just using the mathematical approach.
Title: Re: ways to promote MG?
Post by: Ron on April 04, 2011, 10:10:01 AM
Quote
You cannot break down the frequencies in a Just Major chord and find evidence of 'Good' or 'Sounds Pleasant'.

evidence of sounding good or "bad" traditionally has been based on low-integer ratios. you can argue this all you want but thats a musical fact. reading of joel mandelbaum is in order for you. also, historyand things that already happened are fact, as well as and integers are fact. listening tests and many papers on low integer ratios have been done, and people do like the sound of low integer ratios. Major chord is based on just intonation, specifically 4:5:6 primes 2 3 5. these are facts lol..

Yes when people say "there are no notes between C and C#" i want to SET THEM STRAIGHT, and when they take down links and things i post to educate the general public in a nice way, then it's time to smite the anti-intellectualism.  If you can't handle that you can't handle this site.

Now you're making these accusations that I was putting hate speech there but everything I wrote there was an exacted and warranted response. Thats bullshit, and look - I can use the word bullshit here!

I already told you they deleted EVERYTHING, which mean I must've been cursing in EVERY post, and totally arrogant right?

The first video illustrates my points nicely and it doesn't demonstrate harmony. I have a fretless so I dont understand why you're so up in arms about my point. Most fretless players play pseudo taksim and oud improvisations that sound better on ouds with trad. trained musicians. They don't utilize MOS or higher harmonic as triadic harmony (which is important). This guys going all over the place melodically , but wheres my 7 and 11 limit harmonies?

As for catler this is standard blues stuff, and he's even using a slide here. Where the challenge has been in recent years the modulation of higher prime harmony and preservation of lower harmonics also. 

The importance of distributionally even MOS scales for guitar is shining through in these videos!



Title: Re: ways to promote MG?
Post by: Ron on April 04, 2011, 10:16:49 AM
oh and I forgot to mention, Harry Partch did go to Ervin Wilson at one point concerning his scale. Harry Partch is NOT the end-all by any means and many people have surpassed his theories, and improved greatly on just intonation since him. 

http://launch.groups.yahoo.com/group/tuning/message/93840 (http://launch.groups.yahoo.com/group/tuning/message/93840)

I ran across this thread today and it's very true. Schools can't touch what's happening in because it's happening too fast for them.. Thats why when symposium's happen all the teachers from the universities will gather and talk Just Intonation, like in the case of Bohlen Pierce festival.

http://xenharmonic.wikispaces.com/Regular+Temperaments (http://xenharmonic.wikispaces.com/Regular+Temperaments)

http://xenharmonic.wikispaces.com/JustIntonation (http://xenharmonic.wikispaces.com/JustIntonation)

like I said, I've never heard a fretless player play with inversions of JI,  the subharmonic series, etc..  fretted just fretboards are somewhat limited to static sounds. thats why it's important to explore various ET's  - because they provide  chunks of the harmonic series with interesting dissonances and consonances that are easy to move around, and have distinct "moods".
Title: Re: ways to promote MG?
Post by: TútimDeft on July 02, 2011, 11:52:22 PM
Tú lo has dicho, hermano ;)
Thanks to the tempered system, I have learned to appreciate the sound of the paddling waves at intervals of not very just (as in the cases of 14, 16, 17 and 23 EDOs [obviously that there interval that are the exception in each one of the last mentioned EDOs. Is just a reference]). Now, with respect to JI systems, although it is nice (and that it supposedly corresponds to the true academic music), I was far complicated by having a fretboard with the frets "broken" and many people also involves a huge 'crash' visual.
Title: Re: ways to promote MG?
Post by: bostjan on July 18, 2011, 07:34:55 AM
Honestly, the only way to promote microtonal music to the general public effectively is to make microtonal songs to which the general public will want to listen.  As long as we keep making microtonal music that is regarded as inaccessible by the typical internet user, there will only be a handful of us.

I'm a case in point.  I would have never gone beyond the point of dabbling had I not been introduced to discs by Neil Haverstick and John Catler.  I mean no disrespect to the highly cerebral microtonalists, but about half of the micro music I've heard just doesn't have a groove or hook in it.

Also, too many microtonal composers seem to try too hard to make it obvious that their music is microtonal.  Seriously, the phrasing, the melody, and the chord structure should be the focus of the music.  The tuning should facilitate that, not take the place of the true focus.

I do see microtonality growing very fast.  Ten years ago, when I first set out to find a microtonal guitar, no one knew what I was talking about, and there didn't seem to me like there was a coherent community of people interested in tuning.  But now, we have groups like yahoo MMM and sites like this one, as well as discussion on large and popular forums.  There are even a couple bands out there playing micro guitars and getting some exposure to new audiences.  It's only a matter of time before this thing will reach the light of day.

Title: Re: ways to promote MG?
Post by: Ron on July 18, 2011, 01:36:02 PM
Honestly, the only way to promote microtonal music to the general public effectively is to make microtonal songs to which the general public will want to listen.  As long as we keep making microtonal music that is regarded as inaccessible by the typical internet user, there will only be a handful of us.

I'm a case in point.  I would have never gone beyond the point of dabbling had I not been introduced to discs by Neil Haverstick and John Catler.  I mean no disrespect to the highly cerebral microtonalists, but about half of the micro music I've heard just doesn't have a groove or hook in it.

Also, too many microtonal composers seem to try too hard to make it obvious that their music is microtonal.  Seriously, the phrasing, the melody, and the chord structure should be the focus of the music.  The tuning should facilitate that, not take the place of the true focus.

I do see microtonality growing very fast.  Ten years ago, when I first set out to find a microtonal guitar, no one knew what I was talking about, and there didn't seem to me like there was a coherent community of people interested in tuning.  But now, we have groups like yahoo MMM and sites like this one, as well as discussion on large and popular forums.  There are even a couple bands out there playing micro guitars and getting some exposure to new audiences.  It's only a matter of time before this thing will reach the light of day.


It will just take a few metal releases, and once people realize they will be left behind they'll jump on the wagon.  As for the tuning community - its been more or less a cult of hardcore theorists and musicians, and has been going since the 60's. Kids are already non-prejudice to the scales they are listening to them in timon and pumba, and other disney productions, believe it or not. It will just take a release that shreds twice as hard as anything out.
Title: Re: ways to promote MG?
Post by: bostjan on July 18, 2011, 02:10:38 PM
It does look like metal will be the most likely forum to bring micro music to the west, although I did just recall that Jimmy Page and Robert Plant released a big label record more than ten years ago that featured some 24-EDO stuff on it.  The single from the record did well, but it seems that it didn't stand the test of time, if it never sparked anything further.
Title: Re: ways to promote MG?
Post by: bigbadwolf on November 29, 2011, 09:04:42 AM
The extreme metal genres and more insane types of jazz are the ones that microtonal guitarists usually opt for and they are not very easy to listen to. This exagerates the seemingly 'alien' nature of microtonal music. One option is to start a band with the intention of making reasonably commercial music that incorporates microtonal elements to its sound. There's no reason why someone couldn't write a microtonal pop-rock song, I don't think.

The other thing is that most microtonal musicians will label themselves as microtonal, which is going to limit the potential audience even further since a lot of people seem to think microtonal music is stupid and/or pointless. It's always something like '23-tet death metal' or '19-tet jazz fusion', when it could be more like 'awesome death metal' or 'quality jazz fusion'... oh, this? It's a microtonal guitar. Good, isn't it.

It would be great if an act with a large following started making microtonal music. That would probably be the best possible scenario. I don't see that happening but it would be good if it did.
Title: Re: ways to promote MG?
Post by: bostjan on September 10, 2012, 07:41:50 AM
I will bump an old thread to share this thought:

I was browsing the internet for videos of microtonal guitarists playing their instruments, and 90% of the videos had me thinking "shut up and play."  No disrespect intended, certainly because there is a time and a place to talk theory, but when we post videos of a performance and end of with a lengthy exposition about the instrument, people won't make it to the performance part.  Also, particularly on youtube, there are many negative comments on videos to the effect of "Your guitar is out of tune."  I noticed in most of these cases, that the word "microtonal" was particularly lacking in the video title or even in the description.  Most lay-people don't know what "Limit 13 JI" or even "14-EDO" means, which could result in some rather misguided, albeit humourous, feedback from viewers.

My few offerings to the youtube community have received mostly positive feedback, which gives a pleasurable feeling; however, constructive criticisms are often very short and vague or indirect.  I feel that without constructive feedback, the community will continue to remain isolated from the rest of the musical world.
Title: Re: ways to promote MG?
Post by: Gedankenwelt on September 15, 2012, 08:56:46 AM
Thanks for your input, bostjan - I'll try to remember that, if I decide to post a video on youtube. When promoting microtonal music, it's often helpful to roughly describe what you're doing, i.e. which tuning system and scales you use, and how you can obtain a microtonal instrument. However, if you have to tell a lot of stuff, it's probably better to put that text into the description part of the video.

I think a major problem of microtonal music is that there seems to be no good place to discuss it. This forum is mainly for guitarists, and registration is a little cumbersome, nonoctave.com is down, and Xenharmonic Alliance is only accessible to Facebook users (which I boycott). The tuning [math] list on yahoo groups looks very promising, but requires to register a yahoo mail account, which I don't see much point in (providing an existing email adress should be enough for registration). And discussing microtonal music in a "normal" music forum is usually pretty exhausting. I think it would be nice to have a forum like this one, but for discussing microtonal music in general, and w/o the registration hurdle.

P.S.: I read your thread (http://www.sevenstring.org/forum/extended-range-guitars/10064-string-gauges-inharmonicity.html) about string gauges and inharmonicity on sevenstring.org some time ago - pretty interesting stuff! If you have some data on core / wrap diameters, please send me a PM! ;)
Title: Re: ways to promote MG?
Post by: Mat on September 16, 2012, 06:25:39 PM
I think a major problem of microtonal music is that there seems to be no good place to discuss it. This forum is mainly for guitarists, and registration is a little cumbersome, nonoctave.com is down, and Xenharmonic Alliance is only accessible to Facebook users (which I boycott). The tuning [math] list on yahoo groups looks very promising, but requires to register a yahoo mail account, which I don't see much point in (providing an existing email adress should be enough for registration). And discussing microtonal music in a "normal" music forum is usually pretty exhausting.

Yeah i sympathise with this, i reluctantly and anonymously joined FB to access the XA. I really miss nonoctave, it was the best forum and coded by someone fairly trustworthy. Feel free to discuss any microtonal subjects here as it will be of interest to the (few) members here. I feel bad about the disabled registration, when Ron made me admin it was a shock to discover that spammers make open registration almost impossible, i was spending an hour a day deleting them.
I am on sevenstring as 'ixlramp': http://www.sevenstring.org/forum/members/ixlramp.html (http://www.sevenstring.org/forum/members/ixlramp.html) and occasionally post microtonal stuff there.
Title: Re: ways to promote MG?
Post by: Gedankenwelt on September 17, 2012, 08:54:21 AM
Feel free to discuss any microtonal subjects here as it will be of interest to the (few) members here.
Thanks, I was going to post some topics soon anyway, I just need to scan in some stuff first. I also sent my 8-string baritone guitar to a luthier who will convert it to 31-EDO, so I'll probably be able to record some tracks and post them here in the near future. ;)

P.S.: I sent you a PM with some suggestions about the registration issue, hope they're helpful